Soon after, if not before, the purchase of your new home comes the time that you should find a way to get to know your neighbours. In order to build a good foundation with your community, the ideal solution is to start allowing the neighbours around you to become acquaintances. This could start preventing a number of future problems from rising and help your family to settle in easier. Understandably, not everyone is people friendly however—the reasons you should start mingling with your new community are endless. Here are a few reasons to consider the importance of community living:

Mountains Out of Mole Hills

It is very easy among people living closely together for the smallest issue to snowball into larger problems. Typically, most of these things could have been avoided at the beginning if people felt close enough to be able to work through it. That overgrown tree between the two properties, the dog that barks throughout the night—these are some examples of how easily little things are made into a bigger ones. Avoiding neighbourly disputes can be easy if you know your neighbours well enough to be able to discuss them calmly as friends instead of strangers.

Becoming a Solid Community Member

Getting to know your next door neighbours is easier done than becoming a part of the community. But after a few community events, building a network via the other neighbours, just making an effort to stop and chat—all of this can make you a solid fixture in the community. By becoming a solid community member, you will not only transition your family into the new home and neighbourhood, but will also provide you with a sense of belonging. The extra effort will pay off in the end.

Joining The Neighborhood Watch

During these not so safe times, a good neighbourhood community can pay off when problems are close at hand. For instance; a community that takes pride in themselves and one another pays off when all eyes watch out for each other. If someone’s home gets broken into, there are neighbours around who may be more aware than in other neighbourhoods. Acquaintances and friends will look out for one another’s property, in the event you are away, more than strangers. You may even find you are close enough to trust each other to trade keys during vacation times, to feed each other’s animals or help if someone is sick. Added security is always a relief and knowing that other people are looking out for you can help to keep your mind at peace when there are reasons to be away from home.

Becoming Aware of Problematic Neighbours

Becoming aware of possible problematic neighbours prior to your move is extremely important. Prior to move, drive around the neighbourhood a few times, taking a mental note of any suspicious activities, unruly behavior, overcrowded or noisy visitors, unsociable or disruptive behavior. Try to find out any problems the previous owner may have experienced while they were living there. Educating yourself about your new neighbours can help you know who, if any, neighbours would be considered as problematic. This can help you make decisions about who to associate, trust and even if you want to continue with purchase plans. All it takes is one bad apple to ruin a perfect batch of apples. This can save you a possible lifetime of headaches by being able to avoid those problematic neighbours.

Becoming a Friendly Neighbour

As you can see by getting to know your neighbours when you move into a new home, there are many worthwhile reasons to introduce yourself. Make the added effort and it is possible you can wind up with some good friends. A strong neighbourhood community can really make you feel worthwhile, give you the relief of added security and make you feel more comfortable during a stressful transition when moving into your home. By getting to know your neighbours and in return being a good neighbour yourself, you can see that it can be a rewarding effort for you and your family. It will pay off in the end by giving you more than just a house - it will also give you a home within your community.

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